A Stock Market Ouchie

While I was digging through the bargain bin at the Stock Market I stumbled across a company with a LOT of potential. This media company, while it has its fingers stuck in traditional media sources like television and radio stations, not only creates its own content but has been slowly transitioning to embrace the new way people receive media. I dug through their financials. They had a lot of debt but were otherwise doing okay. Even better, they had realized that the times were changing and, unlike other companies I’ve researched, they were adapting.

Due to the significant dip in their stock price, the dividend was very attractive, enough so that I continued digging. I realized that this company had something in the works to not only reduce its debt but to continue the transition that I’d discovered. I didn’t know what the plan was but I decided to buy in. I scrounged up every penny I could and bought 191 shares, planning to round it out to 200 shares as my finances allowed.

This stock was trading around $5 a share. I ended up investing close to $1,000 in it. Satisfied, I sat back to see what would happen next. Considering that this company, in the years it had been on the exchanges rarely traded for less than $9 a share I figured I could hold it a couple of years and then sell for a tidy profit while receiving dividends for my trouble.

I woke up one morning a couple of weeks later to discover the stock price completely tanking. My pulse went through the roof as I stared. What the hell? I hit the news feeds. As I had predicted, this company had taken some drastic steps to reduce its debt. It had not only written down the value of some assets in order to save money on taxes by reporting a loss for the quarter, it had used that legal jiggery-pokery as an excuse to slash the dividend payout. The money saved would be used to aggressively pay down its debt.

Oh, the financial reporters were screaming! I could almost see them shaking with rage as they ranted against the dividend cut online. This stock had been considered a staple in dividend portfolios yet the company had the nerve to actually slash it–how dare they! Retirees had been counting on that dividend!

As I watched the value of my investment tank I ran the numbers on the new dividend amount. At the price I paid for the stock the return was still a reasonable 5%, yet people were ditching the stock in droves. I watched as the value of the stock dipped lower and lower, debating. Should I sell and then re-buy when it finally bottomed? I’d already lost over $150 in value when I’d discovered the mess. What should I do?

I sat back, took a deep breath, and let it fall. When last I looked the stock was trading at $3.49 a share. It has lost almost $250 in value since I purchased it. I’ll finish up my lot and perhaps buy even more once it hits bottom, if only because I can tell even now that the company is a scrapper. They are paying down their debt while they work out the best way to navigate the challenging media landscape. While I’ve no idea how this will pan out I’ve got faith.

I cannot believe that I am taking this so calmly. Maybe I have what it takes to be an investor after all.

3 thoughts on “A Stock Market Ouchie

    1. Annie Post author

      I’m not sure that would be wise, especially in light of the fact that I am VERY new at this. What if I miscalculated? If I miscalculated and someone follows my path and loses money, then it would be my fault. I’m not sure I feel comfortable doing that. Does that make sense?

      As it is, part of me wonders if I have lost my mind on this decision. According to the books I’ve read, I should have sold out but my gut tells me to hold pat and consider buying more since the stock price is so low.

      Because of this, I ask for patience. Please allow me to get some experience beneath my belt, to see if I’m on the right path before I start sharing names of any companies I’ve invested in. I am terrified I will accidentally lead someone astray at the moment.

      Reply
  1. Linda Sand

    People are screaming at a 5% dividend? Putting that money in the bank would not earn them that much. Given your research I suspect you are right to hold on.

    Reply

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